13 Things Every Manager Should Keep in Mind

Interdependence

Believe it or not, being a manager isn’t about being “the boss” and calling all the shots. Our role as manager, is to maintain the integrity of the work web that everyone relies upon. Every piece of the web plays an important part in the strength and functionality, and the manager is the one who makes sure it holds strong whenever challenges come about.

Managers Keep in Mind

Competition

It seems like a great way to motivate people, but in the end, the same people will almost always win. Rather than encouraging employees to feel superior or inferior, ask them to create personal goals for the week, or for the task at hand.

Development

As Einstein said, “Once you stop learning, you start dying.” That saying goes for employees, just as it goes for Managers and CEO’s. So, keep new information and techniques coming. I promise you, the payoff will far exceed any cost.

Differentiation

Everyone has different experiences, preferences, and learning styles. If you want your employees to learn and improve, then it’s your job to be effective in your approach as a mentor and supervisor. Make tweaks accordingly.

Communication

Create an environment where employees feel it’s safe for them to speak up and share their input. Done simply or creatively, communication is priority one.

Listening

Marge Piercy said, “If you want to be listened to, you should put in time listening.” No further explanation necessary.

Genuineness

Loyalty is born from respect. If you want your employees to respect you, then take some time to get to know them as a person.

Responsibility

“When you point your finger, you have three fingers pointing back at you.” As a manager, this saying can’t be stressed enough. Know your employees and how they work. Be aware of how your team is functioning, and do your part to keep everything running smoothly.

Accountability

It’s never just one person. Everyone on the team plays a role in work performance, whether their efforts be deliberate or passive. Make sure that everyone is able to constructively share their input in the workplace, their co-workers, and even YOU.

Clarity

As lovely as language is, it can also be incredibly ambiguous. Do your best to be direct by providing pictures and examples, reiterating what you’ve expressed, and asking for questions.

Equality

No one likes their boss having a “favorite.” Avoid the drama of mutiny all together by acknowledging the contribution of each and every employee. Everyone will be happier for it, you included.

Creativity

Rather than focusing on all of the challenges and obstacles ahead, get your team together to decide what your goals should be. Collaborate on how they can be met, figure out who should do them, and add in any important extras. Plans resolve problems, and a team of heads will always be better than one.

Rigidity

It’s far too easy to get caught up in our plans, routines, and deadlines. If you find yourself feeling stressed, then take that as a sign to step back and ask for input.

 

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